Dear Judgy Gym Rats: Stop Complaining about “Resolutioners”

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Here they come again — the barrage of gym rats complaining about “resolutioners” on social media. “Watch out!” they say, “the resolutioners are coming!”

“Ugh!” they complain, “the gym is crawling with resolutioners. Can’t wait until February when they all give up on their goals and go home so I can have my gym back.”

As though their $20 monthly fee to Planet Fitness entitles them to an empty, private gym.

As though they are more entitled to the equipment than a person who pays the same membership fee, but only walks into the gym 12 days out of the year.

As though those “resolutioners” aren’t contributing to the very reason why their membership is so dirt cheap.

I’ve got news for all of you hoity-toity daily gymgoers complaining about the January sign-ups: you look like assholes. There I said it. Now I’ll explain why.

First off, your gym membership is subsidized by those “resolutioners” whom you find so annoying. Studies show that a whopping 67% of people with gym memberships never use them. If everybody who paid for a gym membership actually used it on the regular, costs would skyrocket: Gyms would need more space, more equipment, more repairs to that equipment and a heck of a lot more staff. Conversely, if none of those January people bought memberships, guess who’d pick up the rest of the tab? You and your holier-than-thou gym buddies is who. Would you like paying over $100 per month for your gym rats – only facility? Probably not. You save hundreds of dollars each year for the slight inconvenience of dealing with a packed gym during one month. Oh, the horror!

Secondly, and this should really go without saying, but I’ll say it anyway: You don’t own the gym. I know it’s hard to believe, since you’re there almost every day. You know the staff and the other gym-goers. You have your routine. You shower at the gym more than you shower at your own house. You feel like you’re at home. But you’re not. You’re just another customer, like all the other paying costumers. You don’t pay more for your membership than the guy on the machine next to you, and frankly, you’re far costlier to the business than any resolutioner will ever be. So stop thinking that because you hang around at the gym every day, you own it. The owner owns it. And they probably can’t stand your attitude towards the people who actually make their business a lot of money.

Your attitude towards those “resolutioners” actually brings me to my third, final, and most important point: you are contributing to the reason why so many January sign-ups fail to meet their goals. Now, I’m not saying you’re to blame for their “failures.” That would be a huge stretch, to say the very least. But imagine you’re going to a gym for the first time. It’s cold outside, you’re feeling unsure about yourself. You’re not sure what to do once you’re there. Or maybe you’re sure about your routine, but not sure where all of the machines are located. You’re nervous and a little embarrassed about how out-of-shape you are, but you’re ready to get started on your goals. You get to the gym and the staff is super nice to you, encouraging you to sign up for a premium membership, which, they explain, is a much better deal overall. You like perks. So you sign up. Then you actually get to your workout. You’re surrounded by other folks like yourself, but you can’t help but notice some bad energy in the room. There are a few people looking at you with disdain. They’re muscular — obvious regulars — and they’re walking around like they own the place. They sneer at you as you take your turn on the squat rack. They seem obviously annoyed by your presence. Your sense of shame deepens. You feel watched. You feel unwelcome. You feel like you don’t belong. You go back a few times, but you can’t shake the feeling that this is not the place for you. That you’re not really welcome, despite the smiles from the staff, and the convenience of the location. You feel dread every time you tell yourself to go to that place, and sustain those stares and that judgment.

You may think this example is overly dramatic, but this has been my exact experience at almost every gym I’ve ever joined (and those gyms span three states and nearly every price point out there). Even though I am a former elite athlete, I have always felt rather uncomfortable in gyms. The environment is really not welcoming to newcomers, or folks coming off injuries, or even former athletes trying to get back in shape (all of which I’ve been at various points). It wasn’t until I joined an all-women’s gym with an extremely supportive community environment that I felt comfortable at the gym. Since then, I’ve realized that I don’t actually hate the gym, I just hate the hostile environment that pervades so many. And guess what? I’ve been consistently going to that gym multiple days every single week. I’m now a year-round gym rat, when I used to be a resolutioner. I no longer feel a sense of shame every time I go to work out (which is perhaps the most de-motivating feeling on earth). I’ve gained confidence, a support system, new friends, strength and most importantly, a healthier relationship with both my body and mind.

Hostile, non-welcoming environments are really pervasive in gym culture, and they need to end. If you are going to judge people for “giving up,” perhaps you should consider how difficult it is to be in their shoes; how overwhelming it is to step into an unfamiliar environment and feel unwelcome. Perhaps more people would live a healthy lifestyle and reach their fitness goals if they didn’t feel shut out and judged.

But that’s not really what you want, is it? You obviously don’t want the resolutioners to succeed if you “can’t wait” for the time when they “fail” and leave the gym. You want the gym to be cheap and empty, and that rests on those people failing. The absolute least you could do is stop complaining about the one month they’re filling up the gym, and subsidizing you for the rest of the year.

The most you could do is be a little kinder. I’m not saying that you need to stand at the door and greet the newcomers or show them the ropes (let’s leave that to the professionals). You don’t need to spot them, or even converse with them. A simple smile would do. Or just, you know, not openly mocking them on social media and glaring at them while they try to work out. The smallest bit of compassion and kindness can go a long way with someone who’s just starting out.

Remember: we all start somewhere. This year, I’m hoping every single one of those resolutioners meets their goals, and sticks it to the assholes who complain about them. Even more than that, I’m hoping those newly minted gym rats don’t need to read this next year.

Happy fitness-ing in 2016, folks! Be kind to yourself and others.

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10 thoughts on “Dear Judgy Gym Rats: Stop Complaining about “Resolutioners”

  1. Love this. Crazy how it seems so hard for other regular gym goers to support the newbies! Maybe more people could be happy for each other in 2016… right? HA

  2. I couldn’t agree more! I’ve been on both sides and I’m at a point only life now where I really try to just focus on what in doing, not others. Besides, we are In a obesity health epidemic which drives up health care costs (even us healthy people). Hell we should be walking up to the resolution people and congratulate them for their efforts and offer to show them around. Domino effect everyone….positivity breeds positivity.

    • Totally! If the people who are at least showing up were greeted with support rather than hostility, I think we’d see a lot more “resolutioners” sticking around and working on their fitness — not to mention having FUN. People can be so dang judgy, which breeds shame, which causes de-motivation. It doesn’t work. It makes people hide at home and feel bad about themselves — the exact opposite of what they need to succeed!

      • I’m about to join the resolutioners. I had some injuries this fall and had to take a break from classes and running but am excited to say I’ll be back in the gym next week with the personal trainer at my work. Very excited!

      • I don’t quite agree.

        Don’t get me wrong; I *do* agree that people should be welcoming toward newcomers. including the resolutioners. However, when New Year’s resolutioners fizzle out, it generally isn’t because people didn’t say hello to them at the gym. Rather, it’s because MOST NY resolutions are doomed to failure.

        This should come as no surprise. People who genuinely want to make lifestyle changes generally do not wait until January 1st to start. Rather, they start as soon as they can. And when it comes to fitness resolutions… well, waiting until the holiday feastings are over isn’t exactly a sign of grim determination.

        So yes, I do think people should be friendly toward the newbies, and it would be great to help them stick around. The chances of this happening are exceedingly slim, though. Their problem is generally a lack of internal motivation rather than any longing for a firm handshake or a hearty hello.

    • I think it’s ok to feel inconvenienced (we’re all rather invested in our routines, after all), as long as you don’t project that towards the people who are just trying to make fitness a habit like everybody else. 🙂

  3. Brilliant post. Everyone must start somewhere, and I’d lay money on the fact a large percentage of those “hoity-toity” gym-goers started at the gym in January as a new years resolution.

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